This I Believe

I believe my experiences inform my reality. I believe I can teach students to see outside their worlds. I believe I have the capacity to change lives. I believe students can and will surprise me. I believe I can create a culture. I believe students deserve a rigorous education. I believe students can learn.

I believe students deserve bright futures. I believe students’ families are powerful resources. I believe I can’t do it on my own. I believe this is only just the beginning. I believe students want to learn. I believe that I can teach. I believe all students are artists. I believe that my students are teachers. I believe I must put down my own walls. I believe taking risks help me grow. I believe it’s about the journey. I believe it’s important to walk in someone else’s shoes.

I believe in the power of education.

I believe that change is good. I believe that perspective changes attitudes. I believe you get out of life what you put into it. I believe learning languages helps us see others and ourselves for who we truly are. I believe being vulnerable is empowering. I believe I must not fear what I control. I believe knowing students is where we start. I believe people just want to be acknowledged and loved. I believe two heads are better than one. I believe each day is a gift and an opportunity to grow. I believe students will rise to high expectations.

I believe bilingualism is the future.

What underpins all of my beliefs? A solid pedagogical practice steeped in the awareness of individual student needs and the most effective strategies to accelerate student achievement. It is these practices that make by beliefs a reality. However, beyond pedagogy, what I believe about education is a direct reflection of my experiences.

I still remember my high school Spanish teacher, Srta. Garry, telling me that I will make a great Spanish teacher someday. At the time, I completely rejected the idea. I knew I loved Spanish and wanted to learn to speak it by traveling; I was not about to teach it. However, every job since has been related to at the least education and at the most, Spanish education. Paraprofessional, camp counselor, youth group leader, English teacher abroad, teacher’s assistant, nanny, trip director…each has a common thread running through: children. After countless hours in the classroom as a student, close to two years of living abroad and teaching in a immersion classroom, I will finally become what Mrs. Garry said year ago: a Spanish teacher.

3rd graders at Garden of the Gods ♥

I believe so strongly in the power of language. My life would not be what it is today had I not pursued Spanish as a foreign language. Though I studied Spanish in college, travel offered the most eye opening experiences for me. I’ve been lucky enough to travel and see the world in an entirely different way. I want my future students to have opportunities to do the same. have second and third families in Costa Rica and Chile. We communicate via email, Facebook and Skype. This would not be possible without language.

“The limits of my language means the limits of my world”

– Ludwig Wittgenstein

My Chilean students.

Fútbol en Costa Rica (GW 2011)

Terraba, Costa Rica

Simon dice.

At the end of the day, I believe in the power of language. Though I am not a native speaker, some of the strongest ties I have to others are ties made through Spanish. The music I listen to, the movies I watch, the friends and familia I have are all influenced by the languages I speak. My path has taken many turns, but one thing remains the same: I am committed to promoting and celebrating bilingualism.

Do you speak my language?

Lago Titicaca, Peru

Las niñas de DLS

Language is powerful. I believe I can empower my future students to embrace bilingualism and break down barriers to make the world a better place.

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